An analysis of the plot setting and characters of the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

These are not people who concern themselves with eking out a living. Fitzgerald sets the women, Daisy and her friend Jordan Baker, in a dreamlike setting, emphasizing their inability to deal with reality. Another key theme introduced at the dinner party is that of societal expectation. Looking back at the mysterious figure Nick realizes that Gatsby has vanished.

Much of The Great Gatsby centers on appearances and the rift between who or what one is and who or what society wishes or expects. As the scene unfolds and they begin conversation, the superficial nature of these socialites becomes even more pronounced. They rush back to Long Island, where Nick learns from Gatsby that Daisy was driving the car when it struck Myrtle, but that Gatsby intends to take the blame.

As he tries to make his way as a bond salesman, he rents a small house next door to a mansion which, it turns out, belongs to Gatsby.

Daisy insists, "But we heard it. Whereas he is relatively industrious after all, he came East by himself to make his fortune rather than staying home and doing what is expected of himthe Buchanans live in the lap of luxury.

The Great Gatsby

His tolerance has a limit, and it is the challenge to this limit that forms the basis of the book at hand. In this was, the reader is encouraged to trust Nick and to believe in his impartiality and good judgment; a biased narrator will make the narrative reactionary, not honest, so stressing his good judgment is crucial.

After an initially awkward reunion, Gatsby and Daisy reestablish their connection. Daisy and Tom appear in stark contrast to the image of Nick: Readers, wanting to believe in their own moral fortitude, find themselves siding with Nick, trusting him to exercise the same sound judgment they themselves would exercise.

Gatsby proceeds to the water and stretches out his arms toward the water, trembling. Arriving at the mansion, Nick is greeted by Tom, dressed in riding clothes.

Both young women, dressed entirely in white suggesting purity or, in contrast, a void of something such as intellectualismare engulfed by the expansiveness of the room in which they are sitting. Nick denies the rumor flatly: He then fatally shoots himself.

Tom, known for his infidelities, makes no pretense to cover up his affairs. As Tom and Daisy work to set up Nick and Jordan, they seize the opportunity to question him about his supposed engagement to a girl back home.

He stands boldly, with "a rather hard mouth," "a supercilious manner," "two shining arrogant eyes," and speaks with "a touch of paternal contempt. Gatsby tells Jordan that he knew Daisy in Louisville in and is deeply in love with her. The conversation at the dinner furnishes a few key details: Nick has moved East, and disgusted, returns to the Midwest.

The visit not only introduces the other characters crucial to the story, but it also presents a number of themes that will be developed in various ways throughout the novel.

On another level, the delineation between the Eggs can also be a metaphorical representation of the sensibilities of people from the Eastern and Western parts of the United States.

It qualifies Nick to be part of the action which he will unfold — a tale of socialites, money, and privilege — while also keeping him carefully apart. George, who has leapt to the conclusion that the driver of the car that killed Myrtle must have been her lover, finds Gatsby in the pool at his mansion and shoots him dead.

From the very beginning, even before learning about Gatsby, "the man who gives his name to this book," Fitzgerald gives details about Nick.

The story proper begins when Nick moves from the Midwest to West Egg, Long Island, seeking to become a "well-rounded man" and to recapture some of the excitement and adventure he experienced as a soldier in WWI. For instance, when Tom chooses to discuss politics, he reveals himself not just as one who discriminates against people on the basis of class a classicistbut also a racist.

Daisy and Tom introduce Nick to Jordan Baker, a beautiful, cynical young woman with whom Nick begins a romantic relationship. Nick, strangely "confused and a little disgusted" as he drives home, finds an equally curious sight waiting for him when he arrives at his house.ANALYSIS.

The Great Gatsby () F. Scott Fitzgerald when he declared that “My characters are all Scott Fitzgerald.” represent and apply the moral norm of “fundamental decency” to the other characters. The story of Gatsby has left him so outraged that “I felt that I. Throughout the novel, "The Great Gatsby," author F.

Scott Fitzgerald uses four major settings to provide the reader with a well-developed, clearly defined overall setting. These settings are used to represent various themes present in the novel. Fitzgerald describes the Valley of Ashes as a.

Get free homework help on F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: book summary, chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes. F.

Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby follows Jay Gatsby, a man who orders his life around one desire: to be reunited with Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier. Gatsby asks to speak to Jordan alone, and, through Jordan, Nick later learns more about his mysterious neighbor.

Gatsby tells Jordan that he knew Daisy in Louisville in and is deeply in love with her. He spends many nights staring at the green light at the end of her dock, across the bay from his mansion.

Analysis: Plot Analysis. BACK; NEXT ; Most good stories start with a fundamental list of ingredients: the initial situation, conflict, complication, climax, suspense, denouement, and conclusion. Great writers sometimes shake up the recipe and add some spice.

Great Gatsby is set in New York City and on Long Island, in two areas known as "West Egg" and "East Egg"—in real life, Great Neck and Port Washington peninsulas on Long Island.

Long Island's beach communities really were (and still are) home to the rich and fabulous of the New York City area, and Fitzgerald actually lived in a small house in West Egg.

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An analysis of the plot setting and characters of the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald
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